I took my last placebo pill and had sex. Should I take Plan B? Or should I begin my new pack?

If you are taking your birth control pills correctly, consistently and all of time you are protected from pregnancy by 99% for the entire month. The birth control pills elevate your hormones to prevent ovulation – when an egg is released from an ovary – each month. The three weeks of hormonal pills effectively prevent ovulation for the entire month, so when you are taking the placebo pills (which contain no medication) you still won’t ovulate. In your case, if you’ve been taking the pills correctly you do not need to take Plan B– you will just want to start your new pill pack on time. Sperm can live in the vaginal canal for a few days and you don’t want to risk ovulating by starting your pills late.

Some questions you may want to ask yourself when wondering if you are taking your pills correctly might be:

  • Am I taking the pill at the same time every day?
  • Am I missing or skipping any pills?
  • Am I starting my new pack of pills when I’m supposed to?
  • Am I on any other medications that may effect how my pills are working? (an example of this may be antibiotics)

All of these things can influence the effectiveness of your method.

It’s also important to remember that hormonal birth control methods do not protect you from STIs. Use dental dams and condoms during oral, anal, and vaginal sex to help reduce your risk of STI transmission!

With additional questions or concerns, call us at 303-442-5160 to speak with a nurse or make an appointment.