My boyfriend and I had sex for the first time but it wouldn’t go in easily and the condom broke out side of me but still almost in side of my vagina. He reassured me there was only pre-cum in the condom is there anyway I could get pregnant?

Pregnancy is possible whenever semen comes in contact with the vagina. If you are having unprotected sex, there is a risk for pregnancy.  The best way to avoid pregnancy is to use forms of birth control consistently and correctly.

So even if your partner didn’t ejaculate inside of your vagina, pre-ejaculate could still be present. Pre-ejaculate is a clear, sticky fluid released by the penis between the beginning of arousal and ejaculation. Although pre-ejaculate does not contain sperm when it is produced, it can pick up leftover sperm in the urethra. This means that pre-ejaculate can contain sperm when it leaves the body, creating a risk for pregnancy.

If you do not want pregnancy to occur, you could take an Emergency Contraception. You can take Emergency Contraception up to 5 days after having sex. It is more effective the sooner you take it.

It is also important to note that Lubrication is important during sexual contact as well. Although vaginas and penis’ are self-lubricating organs, often times enough lubrication is not produced. Some bodies self-lubricate quite a bit; some don’t at all!  Lubrication will lower the amount of friction during intercourse, reducing the chances that a barrier method (like a external or internal condom) will tear or that a mucus membrane (like the vagina, penis, or anus) will become irritated.

Even if your body does self-lubricate, it’s great to have a bottle of water-based lube on hand just in case things become dry and uncomfortable. It is also important to have good communication if things do begin to feel uncomfortable, ensuring that everyone involved feels safe and comfortable.

If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic to talk about Emergency Contraception, birth control, or have any other questions, call us at 303-442-5160