Archive for BV

I am sexually active…

….. but both me and my boyfriend were virgins when we met. Ever since I have been sexually active, I have noticed a foul fishy smell from my vagina. I have done lots of research and have excluded the possibilities of STIs, so what could it be?

 

Good question!

Vaginas and penis‘ are self-cleaning organs. Much like earwax and tears are parts of the normal functioning of the ear and eye, people secrete moisture from the membranes that line the vagina.

These normal secretions help control the growth of organisms—like yeast and certain bacteria—that are normal, healthy parts of the vagina.

While everyone’s bodies are different, a certain amount of discharge and odor can be completely normal! Knowing what is normal for your body will help you to know when something is abnormal.

If you noticed a change in odor and/or discharge, it can be a sign of infection. Some infections likes Yeast and Bacterial Vaginosis can occur organically from imbalances in the body (stress, diet, and clothing can all contribute to this). These are not STIs, but can be treated. Some of these infections may resolve themselves, but others require medical treatment. Although Yeast and Bacterial Vaginosis are not STIs, some STIs can also cause also abnormal discharge.

It would be a good idea to see a medical provider. They can determine if an infection is present, and they can offer treatment. If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinicgive us a call at 303-442-5160

 

 

I’ve been experiencing a vaginal discharge ……

……. with a fishy odor and it’s color is yellowish greenish. After a penetration, I feel my vagina is sore and it burns when I urinate.

Vaginas and penis‘ are self-cleaning organs. Much like earwax and tears are parts of the normal functioning of the ear and eye, people secrete moisture from the membranes that line the vagina.

These normal secretions help control the growth of organisms—like yeast and certain bacteria—that are normal, healthy parts of the vagina.

While everyone’s bodies are different, a certain amount of discharge and odor can be completely normal! Knowing what is normal for your body will help you to know when something is abnormal.

If you noticed a change in odor and/or discharge, it can be a sign of infection. Pain after intercourse and burning with urination can also be a sign of an infection.

Some infections likes Yeast and Bacterial Vaginosis can occur organically from imbalances in the body (stress, diet, and clothing can all contribute to this). These are not STIs, but can be treated. Some of these infections may resolve themselves, but others require medical treatment. Although Yeast and Bacterial Vaginosis are not STIs, some STIs can also cause abnormal discharge.

It would be a good idea to see a medical provider. They can determine if an infection is present, and they can offer treatment. If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic give us a call at 303-442-5160

 

Do I need a parent to get treated for bv? I’m 16 yrs old

Great question!

It is  important to know is that in the state of Colorado, the law says that minors have the right to access any sexual healthcare without the consent or notification of their parents. That means they can start a birth control method, get tested for STIs, or get any other sexual healthcare without their parents being involved at all. In fact, it’s illegal for clinics to share sexual health information with parents (or anyone else!) without an individual’s permission. Teen Clinic offers free or low-cost and confidential sexual health services.

With that being said, Teen Clinic encourages teens to have a trusted adult in their life that they can talk to about their sexual health- whether it be a parent, a teacher, a coach, or an aunt or uncle. But we also understand that teens might not have someone they can talk to. That’s why Teen Clinic offers a safe and confidential space for teens to get the information and/or care that they might need. Many teens bring their parent or guardian with them to their appointment, but it is not required!

Bacterial vaginitis, or BV, is an organic infection in which normal healthy bacteria are absent from the vagina, and other bacteria are present in abnormally high numbers.  In some people, BV will occur naturally right before or right after menstruation, then resolve itself. In other cases, the imbalance may require medical treatment.

If you think you are having symptoms of BV, you can come to Teen Clinic to get tested and potentially get treatment. To make an appointment give us a call at 303-442-5160

What does it mean when the vagina itches and burns for no reason does it mean I have an infection?

Burning in and around the vagina could mean a variety of things.

Some people with a vagina may experience yeast infections or bacterial vaginitis that can cause burning. Burning can also be a symptom of some sexually transmitted infections.In order for someone to contract an STI, they would need to engage in sexual activity with a person who already has an STI.

If this burning continues, it would be a good idea to see a medical professional to figure out exactly what is going on. You can learn how to make an appointment here.  You can also take comfort in knowing that all of our clinicians here at Teen Clinic specialize in seeing teens and provide non-judgmental care! Give us a call with more questions! 303-442-5160.

Ever wonder why people get vaginal infections that aren’t STIs?

Fishy smell? Weird discharge? It might not be an STI.

This great article at mysexprofessor.com explores the “netherworld” of the vagina, where colonies of common bacteria can overgrow into Bacterial Vaginosis (BV). This common infection is curable, but is often mistaken for an STI.

“How does the curious mix of microbes down there help to keep us healthy?” writer Dyani Lewis asks, “…and how can we restore balance once it is lost?”

To read the full article, visit: http://www.mysexprofessor.com/the-science-of-sex/ecology-of-the-nether-region/

 

Can you still get an STI even if you haven’t had sex?

In general, sexually transmitted infections are just that—sexually transmitted! If you are not engaging in sexual activity, you are not at risk for STIs.

However, there are a few infections considered STIs that can spread non-sexually.  For instance, pubic lice (also known as Crabs) can be spread through wet towels, loofahs, bedsheets, and wet clothing. Pubic lice can live outside the body for up to 24 hours in locations that are warm, dark, and moist, which makes it easier for them to spread without sexual activity.  Additionally, according to the Center for Disease Control, 4% of all cases of Trichomononiasis are transmitted through hot tubs and wet towels.

Bloodborne STIs—like HIV, Syphilis, and Hepatitis B & C—can also be spread non-sexually. This most often occurs during IV drug use, medical needle sticks, or blood transfusions that did not receive proper screening.  Again, it’s important to realize these infections would not be considered STIs in this scenario, since they were not spread sexually. (However, if you received them non-sexually, you could still transmit them to others through sexual activity.)

Last, it’s important to be specific about what we mean by “sex.”  If you are engaging in genital to genital contact—even if you are not engaging in penetrative oral, anal, or vaginal sex—you are at risk for some STIs. In particular, HPV, Herpes, Syphilis (when a sore is present), and pubic lice can all spread through skin to skin contact.

If you are experiencing symptoms of an STI but haven’t been sexually active, you may want to read a bit about yeast infections and bacterial vaginitis. These are organic infections—they can occur without being transmitted from anyone—but they can be just as uncomfortable as some STIs. If you are experiencing pain, bleeding, itching, or discharge, make an appointment to see a medical provider soon.

Thanks for asking this (slightly complicated) question!

Why do I keep getting yeast infections if don’t take birth control pills? Is this normal?


Great question! Yeast infections actually aren’t related to birth control pills at all.  Yeast is a natural part of the vaginal flora, existing in balance with different types of bacteria. Sometimes yeast can overgrow—this is what we call a yeast infection. Yeast overgrowth can occur for many reasons, including illness, recent antibiotic use, poor vaginal hygiene, and eating too much sugar. Symptoms of a yeast infection can include itching, burning, bleeding after intercourse, and an increase in white, clumpy discharge.

If you are having repeat yeast infections, it’s a good idea to see a medical provider.  The nurse can help troubleshoot the reoccurring infection. She can also make sure you don’t actually have a different (but similar) infection, like bacterial vaginitis or an STI.  Thanks for being so aware of your body!

I am 15 years old and I have strong vaginal odor…

…I am not sexually active. I shower every morning but by mid-day I can smell the odor. It’s not so much a fishy smell but just a strong odor. I use panty liners and wipes. Is there anything else I can try?

First of all, it’s great that you’re paying attention to your body! A change in odor can be a sign of infection, so it’s a good idea to make an appointment at Teen Clinic for a pelvic exam to make sure you’re healthy.  Even though you’re not sexually active, some infections like yeast and bacterial vaginitis can occur organically from imbalances in the body. Some of these infections may resolve themselves, but others require medical treatment.

At Teen Clinic, we recommend washing only the vulva (the outside of the vagina), and only with mild soap and water.  While wipes may seem like they help, they can actually upset the natural balance of the vagina.  Keep in mind that the vagina is a self-cleaning organ. Much like earwax and tears are parts of the normal functioning of the ear and eye, all females secrete moisture from the membranes that line the vagina. These normal secretions help control the growth of organisms—like yeast and certain bacterias—that are normal, healthy parts of the vagina. While everyone’s bodies are different, some amount of discharge can be expected.

Give us a call to make an appointment this week. Teen Clinic uses next-day scheduling, so you’ll want to call the day before you’d like to come in, as close to 9am as possible. Check out our hours here.

Can you still get pregnant if you had BV for a year and didn’t know until presently?

Bacterial vaginitis, or BV, is an organic infection in which normal healthy bacteria are absent from the vagina, and other bacteria are present in abnormally high numbers.  In some people, BV will occur naturally right before or right after menstruation, then resolve itself. In other cases, the imbalance may require medical treatment.

In very rare cases, a bacterial vaginitis infection can turn into PID, or Pelvic Inflammatory Disease. There is an increased risk of infertility from PID; however, BV that has not turned into PID will not cause infertility. It may cause bleeding, pain during intercourse, increased discharge, itching, or burning.

If you have not received treatment for your BV yet, make an appointment at Teen Clinic! The practitioners there will be able to answer your questions about fertility in depth. And don’t forget to use a condom consistently, correctly, and every time to prevent pregnancy and STIs.

I had sex recently. It was protected, but my vagina itches now…

… I’m really scared!!

First of all—good for you! It’s great that you made the healthy decision to use a condom, and it’s important to be aware of your body, too!

Vaginal itching can occur for all sorts of reasons. Some females may experience yeast or bacterial vaginitis infections after intercourse; others may experience a reaction to spermicides or lubricants.  Itching can also be a symptom of some sexually transmitted infections.

The most important thing is to see a healthcare provider if the itching continues. Teen Clinic offers free or low-cost and confidential infection checks if you’re under 20. Just give us a call to schedule for the next possible day.