Archive for LGBTQ

I’m struggling with coming out to my parents as Transgender. They’re not accepting of LGBTQ people… What should I do?

Thank you for asking this question! We are sorry you are not getting the support that you need. At Teen Clinic, we understand that coming out can feel scary or isolating.

If you don’t feel comfortable telling your parents, maybe you can start with talking to another trusted adult.  That can be a variety of different people. That might be a mentor, teacher, school counselor, or older sibling.  Talking with this trusted adult could possibly help you practice what you want to say. And it is very likely this person can help you and support you if/when you decide to talk to your parents.

If you live in the Boulder area it would be worth checking out OASOS. This  is a weekly peer support group for questioning, queer, intersex, pansexual, transgender, bisexual, lesbian and gay youth. The groups are drop in – so you can attend whenever you feel comfortable. The groups are safe, confidential and free. It’s a great opportunity to meet other LGBTIQ youth, gain support from peers and LGBTIQ adult mentors, and have fun through a variety of different educational and social activities. If you have any other questions about group, please don’t hesitate to call their office at (303) 579-2676. 

Whatever you do, know that people are here for you. You can always visit Teen Clinic to talk with our non-judgmental, friendly and caring health care professionals. Know that you have support and resources in the community so you don’t have to go through it alone.

I’m struggling with my sexuality. I dont know if I am bisexual or gay.

Sexuality is complicated, and can be confusing!  A person’s sexuality can even change over time.  At Teen Clinic, we encourage youth to define their sexuality however they like.

If you’re feeling confused about your sexuality, consider asking yourselfWho am I physically and emotionally attracted to? Who do I want to be sexually active with?  How do I identify myself?

A person may be physically and emotionally attracted to the opposite gender, the same gender, or both genders.  All are perfectly normal! Think about whether a label for your sexual orientation will be helpful to you.  Identifying as bi, gay, or questioning can help connect you to friends, communities and resources who will help you explore your feelings in a positive, healthy way Consider checking out a local group like OASOS. OASOS is a weekly peer support group for questioning, queer, intersex, pansexual, transgender, bisexual, lesbian and gay youth. The groups are drop in – so you can attend whenever you feel comfortable. The groups are safe, confidential and free. It’s a great opportunity to meet other LGBTIQ youth, gain support from peers and LGBTIQ adult mentors, and have fun through a variety of different educational and social activities. If you have any other questions about group, please don’t hesitate to call the office (303) 678-6259.

Whatever you do, don’t let yourself feel isolated! You are certainly not alone! 

Above all, we encourage you to talk to someone you trust. Reaching out to the people who care about you is an important step of finding support. You can always visit Teen Clinic to talk with our non-judgmental, friendly and caring health care professionals. Know that you have support and resources in the community so you don’t have to go through it alone.

Thanks for reaching out to us!

I think I’m bisexual but I’m not sure. What do I do?

Who we like, what we find attractive, or what turns us on is very personal and part of what makes us unique! Attraction can be emotional, physical and/or visual.

Sexuality is complicated, and can be confusing!  A person’s sexuality can even change over time.  At Teen Clinic, we encourage youth to define their sexuality however they like. If putting a label on who you’re attracted to is something you want to do, you can do that using common terms (there are many!), or you can even make one up! Just know that there is no right or wrong way to identify – even if that means that you choose not to put a label on it!

If you’re feeling confused about your sexuality, consider asking yourself: Who am I attracted to? Who am I sexually active with?  How might I identify (or choose not to identify) myself?

For some people, the answers to these questions will all point in the same direction.  A person may be attracted to the opposite sex, be sexually active with the opposite sex, and identify as straight.  For others, however, the answer may be more complicated.  A person may be attracted to multiple sexes, but sexually active with one only sex.  Whether this person identifies as gay, straight, bisexual, queer, or as something else is totally up to them.

Think about whether a sexual label will be helpful to you.  Because sexuality can fluctuate throughout life, your feelings may fit a label clearly one year and not the next. On the other hand, identifying as bi (or Questioning) can help connect you to friends, communities and resources who will help you explore your feelings in a positive, healthy way.  Consider checking out local groups like OASOS and Out Boulder, where you can meet others in your shoes and learn more about sexuality in general.

Whatever you do, don’t let yourself feel isolated! There are lots of other youth asking the same questions you are, and lots of adults who want to support you.

I’m a 16 year old girl and my girlfriend of 10 months and I have been sexually active…

…Recently I have been bleeding, like spotting but I am not on my period. I have never had sex with a guy. What does this mean?

Someone’s period can actually fluctuate based on what’s going on in their life.  This means that stresssicknesschange in physical activity, or even worrying about being pregnant can make a period act differently.

While sometimes menstruation happens on the traditional 28-day cycle, plenty do not.  It’s possible that you may have had an annovulatory cycle (that you did not release an egg this month).  A missed ovulation can translate to a missed or irregular period. While this can be healthy and normal, make an appointment if you find yourself worrying about your period. Our Teen Clinic practitioners can offer tips and strategies for regulating the period, and they’ll make sure you’re healthy.

And although you have never had sex with someone with a penis, it’s important to know that even though pregnancy might not be a risk, STIs can be.

It’s good to know that when it comes to STIs, there are four modes of transmission.  They are…

  • Blood
  • Semen
  • Vaginal fluids
  • Skin to skin contact

In order for someone to contract an STI, they would need to engage in sexual activity with a person who already has an STI in which one or more of these modes would come into play. Although STIs can be common, remember that they are preventable!

STIs can be transmitted through oral sex, anal sex, and vaginal sex. Many people think that with oral sex, there is little to no risk. But the fact is, you can get all STIs (except for pubic lice) when engaging in oral sex with someone who has the infection.

So remember to reduce your risk of STI transmission by using barrier methods and getting tested regularly! If you have more questions or want to make an appointment, call Teen Clinic at 303-442-5160.

I think I’m bisexual, but I’m not sure. I might be attracted to this girl…

… who is in three of my classes but I’m not sure. I also have this really big crush on a boy who is in one of my other classes. Do you know how I can tell if I am bisexual?

What turns us on, or what we find attractive is very personal and part of what makes us unique! Attraction can be emotional, physical and/or visual.

It sounds like when you interact with the girl in your classes, it’s very pleasing and attractive to you, and when you interact with the boy in your other classes, you feel the same way – and that’s totally okay and healthy!

During adolescence, our bodies change and we begin to figure out what we find attractive. This is a healthy and completely normal process to go through!

Sexuality is complicated, and can be confusing!  A person’s sexuality can even change over time.  At Teen Clinic, we encourage youth to define their sexuality however they like. If putting a label on who you’re attracted to is something you want to do, you can do that using common terms (there are many!), or you can even make one up! Just know that there is no right or wrong way to identify – even if that means that you choose not to put a label on it!

If you’re feeling confused about your sexuality, consider asking yourself: Who am I attracted to? Who am I sexually active with?  How might I identify (or choose not to identify) myself?

For some people, the answers to these questions will all point in the same direction.  A person may be attracted to the opposite sex, be sexually active with the opposite sex, and identify as straight.  For others, however, the answer may be more complicated.  A person may be attracted to both sexes, but sexually active with one only sex.  Whether this person identifies as gay, straight, bisexual, queer, or as something else is totally up to them.

People who identify as bisexual are generally either attracted to both sexes, sexually active with both sexes, or both of these.

Think about whether a sexual label will be helpful to you.  Because sexuality can fluctuate throughout life, your feelings may fit a label clearly one year and not the next. On the other hand, identifying as bi (or Questioning) can help connect you to friends, communities and resources who will help you explore your feelings in a positive, healthy way Consider checking out local groups like OASOS and Out Boulder, where you can meet others in your shoes and learn more about sexuality in general.

Whatever you do, don’t let yourself feel isolated! There are lots of other youth asking the same questions you are, and lots of adults who want to support you.

I’m a 14 year old girl struggling with my sexuality. A guy I used to like three years ago just admitted he wants to be with me since we cuddled last week…

…but I’m having feelings for my girl best friend. The thing is she doesn’t know, and I can’t tell her. I asked her to be there for me, but it seems like she always has something planned or found an excuse not to see me. I don’t know what to do, I don’t think I feel anything for the guy, but I know that my relationship with my best friend is never going to get any further either.

Sexuality is complicated, and can be confusing!  A person’s sexuality can even change over time.  At Teen Clinic, we encourage youth to define their sexuality however they like.

If you’re feeling confused about your sexuality, consider asking yourself: Who am I physically and emotionally attracted to? Who do I want to be sexually active with?  How do I identify myself?

A person may be physically and emotionally attracted to the opposite gender, the same gender , or both genders.  All are perfectly normal! Think about whether a label for your sexual orientation will be helpful to you.  Identifying as bi, gay, or questioning can help connect you to friends, communities and resources who will help you explore your feelings in a positive, healthy way Consider checking out local groups like OASOS Out Boulder, and/or PFLAG. All organizations are youth-friendly and accessible. They provide great social opportunities to meet supportive role models and peers.

OASOS is a weekly peer support group for questioning, queer, intersex, pansexual, transgender, bisexual, lesbian and gay youth. The groups are drop in – so you can attend whenever you feel comfortable. The groups are safe, confidential and free. It’s a great opportunity to meet other LGBTIQ youth, gain support from peers and LGBTIQ adult mentors, and have fun through a variety of different educational and social activities. If you have any other questions about group, please don’t hesitate to call the office (303) 678-6259 or email.

You can also check out a few quality online resources. The Center is a Denver community center that is dedicated to providing support and advocacy for Colorado’s LGBTIQ population. LAMBDA has a page exclusively for youth feeling isolated and ostracized. It’s a comprehensive site with quality, helpful information for LGBTIQ youth. There is also a National Help Center which has peer counseling online or on the phone.

Whatever you do, don’t let yourself feel isolated! There are lots of other youth asking the same questions you are, and lots of adults who want to support you.

You are not alone.

Above all, we encourage you to talk to someone you trust. Reaching out to the people who care about you is an important step of finding support. You can always visit Teen Clinic to talk with our non-judgmental, friendly and caring health care professionals. Know that you have support and resources in the community so you don’t have to go through it alone.