Archive for penis

I have a bump on my penis. What is it?

Bumps on the penis can mean many different things. This could be something as simple as an ingrown hair, or something more serious like an STI.

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to tell what’s going on without seeing a doctor in person. You can call us at the Teen Clinic to make an appointment with one of our doctors. We offer free or low cost and confidential services. Just call us at 303-442-5160.

Hi I have these white bumps around the edge of the head of my penis……..

…………..I’d heard they’re nothing to worry about but I’m becoming extremely self conscious of them. I feel really embarrassed and awkward to talk to anyone about them. Thanks.

Bumps on the penis can mean many different things. This could be something as simple as an ingrown hair, or something more serious like an STI.

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to tell what’s going on without seeing a doctor in person. You can call us at the Teen Clinic to make an appointment with one of our doctors. Just call us at 303-442-5160

Can you get pregnant if the penis just rubs against the vagina a couple times and didn’t go in?

In order for someone to get pregnant, semen needs to come into direct contact with the vagina. But even if someone does not ejaculate in the vagina, there is still a risk of pregnancy. If someone ejaculates on the outside of the body but still near the vagina, sperm can travel in to the vagina, putting them at risk of pregnancy.

If someone is having unprotected sex, but they don’t ejaculate in or near their  partner, pregnancy can still be possible as well because of something called pre-cum (or pre-ejaculate). Pre-cum is something that everyone with a penis does when arousal happens. Pre-cum—officially called pre-ejaculate—is a clear, sticky fluid released by the penis between the beginning of arousal and ejaculation.  Doctors believe that pre-ejaculate helps make the urethra and the vagina less acidic, allowing sperm to survive longer.  Some people release a small amount of pre-ejaculate; others may release quite a bit.

Although pre-ejaculate does not contain sperm when it is produced, it can pick up leftover sperm in the urethra. This means that pre-ejaculate can contain sperm when it leaves the body, creating a risk for pregnancy.  Pre-ejaculate can also transmit STIs.

Did you know that sperm can also survive inside the vagina for 2-3 days under normal conditions?  If that person ovulates several days after bleeding has stopped, they may become pregnant from sperm left in the vaginal canal during intercourse.

The best way to avoid pregnancy is to use forms of birth control consistently and correctly. Teen Clinic offers all different types of birth control. Call us at 303-442-5160 if you have more questions or want to make an appointment!

I have a bump on my penis. I’m not sure what it is or if it’s normal or bad. Should I get checked out?

Bumps on the penis can mean many different things. This could be something as simple as an ingrown hair, or something more serious like an STI.

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to tell what’s going on without seeing a doctor in person. You can call us at the Teen Clinic to make an appointment with one of our doctors. Just call us at 303-442-5160 the day before you want an appointment!

My boyfriend put his unprotected penis near my vagina. He couldn’t get it in and he only tried for maybe less than 30 seconds…

 5-6 minutes later he ejaculated, not in my vagina. What is going to happen? I’m very scared.

Technically, any time semen can come into contact with the vagina, there is a risk of pregnancy. Even if someone doesn’t ejaculate into the vagina, if there is a chance that the semen may have gotten close enough to the opening of the vagina to travel up into the vagina, pregnancy may be a possibility.

There is also something called pre-ejaculation that can happen before actual ejaculation. Once arousal happens, a liquid called pre-ejaculate can seep out the tip of the penis. Although pre-ejaculate itself doesn’t contain sperm, it travels through the urethra in the process of leaving the body, and can pick up sperm left over from previous ejaculations.  That means pregnancy is possible even before ejaculation has occurred.

Any brand of emergency contraception is also an option if you’re concerned about pregnancy. Emergency contraception contains a high level of progesterone.  This spike of progesterone in the body can prevent ovulation, or keep the egg from being released from the ovary.  That’s why it’s important to take Plan B as soon as possible after unprotected sex; pregnancy isn’t possible if ovulation is prevented.

Plan B is not an abortion. It prevents pregnancy—it doesn’t end a pregnancy. If a pregnancy has already occurred, Plan B will not harm the pregnancy (or your body) in any way. Plan B can be taken up to five days after unprotected sex, but it is more effective in the first 48 hours.  Walk in to Teen Clinic any time we’re open if you need Plan B; we offer it either for free or at a low-cost to anyone under 20. If you are under 18, all of your services at Teen Clinic will be free.  If you are 18 or 19, there may be a small flat fee for your services based on your income.

Teen Clinic recommends wearing condoms 100%, for the duration of sexual activity, to best reduce the risk of both unplanned pregnancy and STIs. Remember, your partner may not have complete control over when ejaculation occurs; it’s better to be safe if you’re not ready for pregnancy.

You can always call Teen Clinic and talk with one of our health care professionals with additional questions! 303-442-5160.

I have an un-circumcised penis. I might be having sex soon but my foreskin doesn’t go back…

I’m worried and curious if circumcision is an option at 16?

That’s a great question! Let’s start out by talking about the simple difference between a circumcised and uncircumcised penis; a thin layer of skin! That thin layer of skin is known as the foreskin. The foreskin surrounds the head of an uncircumcised penis and is highly sensitive to stimulation. When a person with an uncircumcised penis gets an erection, the foreskin will generally retract over the shaft and expose the head of the penis.  But for some people who are uncircumcised, the foreskin may not retract completely when erect. This will leave the head of the penis covered, and may make intercourse either painful and/or impossible. Sometimes you are able to manually retract the foreskin by pulling it back over the shaft of the penis. But remember, foreskin is very delicate and full of nerve endings so be gentle! If you experience any pain when attempting to manually retract the foreskin, stop!

Some people have a longer foreskin, which is actually quite normal. This means that the foreskin would not completely retract when the penis is fully erect. Having a longer foreskin can actually be beneficial sometimes because of the added lubrication it provides during intercourse.

Circumcision is often done when someone with a penis is an infant, but adult circumcision is not unheard of. Circumcision is actually a safe procedure, and for adult men it can be easily performed with anesthesia. Circumcision is the surgical removal of the foreskin. This can mean removing all of the foreskin, or just certain parts, but it is usually the skin that covers the head of the penis.

Although adult circumcision is a relatively simple procedure, there is a 4-6 week recovery time, and in that recovery time certain side effects may include:

  • temporary pain after surgery
  • temporary irritation of the head of the penis
  • different or decreased sensation during sex

You would also need to refrain from sex or masturbation (or any instance where you would get an erection) because this may cause pain and discomfort or disrupt sutures.

Having a conversation with a health care provider would be the best step for you to take next. Talk with them about your concerns with the foreskin not retracting. This may be something that may or may not need to be resolved with circumcision, but either way talk to a health care provider about what might be the best option for you and your body!

For now, remember to thoroughly wash your penis using these simple steps:

  • Gently pull back the foreskin
  • Clean beneath the foreskin with mild soap and water
  • Rinse and dry beneath the foreskin

I have pearly penile papules. What should I do?

 Pearly penile papules are small round bumps on the rim of the penis head.  Usually flesh-colored or a little lighter, many males who find them worry they have an STI. Despite their appearance, pearly penile papules are not a sexually transmitted infection. They are not cancerous or contagious, and they do not need to be removed for any medical reason. Often, pearly penile papules can appear and disappear naturally over time.

Those who feel self-conscious about having pearly penile papules might consider a removal procedure called “carbon dioxide laser ablation.”  However, many medical professionals do not recommend this treatment since it is not medically necessary. The procedure can also leave scarring or cause infection. Be sure to talk with your doctor in depth if you are considering having your pearly penile papules removed. Teen Clinic does not offer this service.

So in short—nope! You don’t need to do anything at all.  You are still safe and healthy. Talk with a provider at Teen Clinic if you want to brainstorm how to discuss this with partners.

I don’t think I’ve had a wet dream yet but I produced a somewhat sticky substance while I was getting intimate with my girlfriend…

…although we were not actually engaging in intercourse. What is this and is there a risk for pregnancy?

Great question!  The substance you’re referring to is called pre-ejaculate (also known as pre-cum). Pre-ejaculate is a clear, sticky fluid often released by the penis between arousal and ejaculation.  Some penises release little to no pre-ejaculate; others may release quite a bit.  Doctors believe the purpose of pre-ejaculate is to make the urethra and the vagina less acidic, allowing sperm to survive longer.

Although pre-ejaculate does not contain sperm when it is produced, it can pick up leftover sperm in the urethra. This means that pre-ejaculate can contain sperm when it leaves the body, creating a risk for pregnancy.  Pre-ejaculate can also transmit STIs. If you do decide to have intercourse, be sure to use condoms consistently, correctly, and every time. If you decide to abstain from intercourse, pregnancy is not a risk unless semen or pre-ejaculate actually touches the vagina.

I had unprotected sex and my penis has two bumps and the tip is sore. Could I have rubbed it raw?

It’s possible. The skin in the genital area is very sensitive, and may become tender from overuse.  However, make an appointment at Teen Clinic if you are still experiencing symptoms. Unprotected sex can allow the transmission of STIs, including skin infections like herpes, HPV, and pubic lice, so it’s important to make sure you’re healthy.

Unprotected sex also carries a risk of pregnancy. No hormonal birth control method is 100% effective; use condoms consistently, correctly, and all the time!  You can get unlimited condoms for free at Teen Clinic; just walk in anytime we’re open!

Can you still get pregnant if the guy pulls out before he ejaculates?

Yes.  When a person with a penis is aroused, a clear fluid called pre-ejaculate can seep out the tip of the penis. While pre-ejaculate contains less sperm than semen, it can still contain sperm! This means there is a risk for pregnancy during vaginal sex even if the male does not ejaculate into the vagina.

Whether or not you’ve noticed pre-ejaculate on the tip of the penis, it’s important to use a condom correctly, consistently, and every time. Withdrawal methods do not prevent the transmission of sexually transmitted infections, and are very ineffective at preventing pregnancy. Make an appointment at Teen Clinic to learn more about hormonal birth control methods, which are more than 99% effective if used correctly.