Archive for period

Is it normal to not have periods while on birth control?

Great question!

It really depends on the form of birth control.

Sometimes when a person first starts birth control, their periods can change or be irregular while their body gets used to the new hormones.  This will vary for different bodies, but can last for awhile.

Some forms of birth control thin the lining of the uterus/stop the uterine lining from building up. This, in turn, can stop someone’s period completely.  This is medically healthy and okay for this to happen, but only for certain types of birth control methods

If you are concerned about your period and what to discuss it with a provider, you can give us a call at 303-442-5160.

I had sex on my last day of my period….

….My boyfriend said that a small amount of sperm came inside me after he pulled it out and ejaculated. Can I get pregnant with that? Thank you.

Pregnancy is possible when someone has sex on their period because pregnancy depends on ovulation ( when the egg is released from the ovary) and ovulation can happen anytime during the month.

If someone is having unprotected sex, but they don’t ejaculate in or near their  partner, pregnancy can still be possible as well because of something called pre ejaculate Pre-ejaculate is a clear, sticky fluid released by the penis between the beginning of arousal and ejaculation.  Some people release a small amount of pre-ejaculate; others may release quite a bit.

Although pre-ejaculate does not contain sperm when it is produced, it can pick up leftover sperm in the urethra. This means that pre-ejaculate can contain sperm when it leaves the body, creating a risk for pregnancy.  Pre-ejaculate can also transmit STIs.

The best way to reduce the risk of pregnancy is to use forms of birth control consistently and correctly. Most forms of birth control can be up to 99% effective when used correctly. Remember, birth control does not reduce the risk of STIs, only condoms and dental dams can.

 Teen Clinic offers all different types of birth control. Call us at 303-442-5160 if you want to make an appointment!

Is it ok to have sex on your period?

Thanks for asking this!

Whether someone chooses to have sex on their period is totally up to them!

What is important to remember though is that it would be important to use a barrier method to reduce the risk of STI transmission.  Since STIs can be transmitted through genital to genital contact, sexual fluids AND blood, there would be a higher risk of transmission.

If you are having the type of sex that can lead to pregnancy, it’s important to know that pregnancy is also still possible when someone has sex on their period because pregnancy depends on ovulation ( when the egg is released from the ovary) and ovulation can happen anytime during the month.

In addition to using a condom, it would be a good idea to be on a form of birth control as well. Most forms of birth control can reduce the risk of pregnancy up to 99% when they are used correctly.

If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic or have more questions, give us a call at 303-442-5160

I’m 13 and I haven’t had my period in 3-4 months…..

…..I’m not sexually active and the first time I had my period was when I was 10-11. So shouldn’t my flow be normal already? This type of problem had happened before when I was 12 or 13. I hadn’t had my period for 2-3 months but I came back then disappeared again… should I be worried?

Thanks for asking this!

It is important to know there are many reasons why someone may not have a regular period.  When someone gets their period for the first time, it is possible for it to take some time before someone has a predictable and routine cycle.

Sometimes a person just naturally has a less predictable period, which can be perfectly medically okay.  Also, lots of factors can make a person’s period fluctuate. Things like being sick, sleep, stress, exercise, and diet can all make a person’s period change or fluctuate.

If you are concerned about your period, or you would like to discuss ways to regulate your period (there are many types of birth control methods that help people regulate/manage their periods) you can call us at Teen Clinic to make an appointment! 303-442-5160

I was wondering what choice of birth control would help my period?

….My cramps get really bad and my flow gets so heavy I have to wear a tampon so I don’t leak. I’m not planning to be sexually active ever, so I just want something to ease the side effects of my period.

 

This is a great question!

There are a lot of different birth control options out there that people use to help with their periods.

Methods like the Hormonal IUD and Depo Shot can change a period. This is because the hormones in these methods cause the lining of the uterus to thin. So a person with one of these methods might have a lighter period, or stop having a period all together.  Not having a period with these methods is completely medically healthy and ok!

Methods like the The Pill, The Patch, and The Ring can help a person have a lighter and more regular period.  With these, the person is on the method for 3 weeks and is off of the method for the 4th week, and that is the week they will usually get their period.  Periods and cramps may be lighter with these methods.

The best thing to do would be to make an appointment with a medical provider. They can go over your health history and help you decide what method may be best for you.  If you want to make an appointment at our Teen Clinic you can give us a call at 303-442-5160. In in the meantime you can visit our page about birth control here to learn more information.

 

My boyfriend and I had sex while I was on my period….

….. We do not always use condoms but he never finishes inside of me.

Pregnancy is possible when someone has sex on their period because pregnancy depends on ovulation ( when the egg is released from the ovary) and ovulation can happen anytime during the month.

If someone is having unprotected sex, but they don’t ejaculate in or near their  partner, pregnancy can still be possible as well because of something called pre ejaculate.  Pre-ejaculate is a clear, sticky fluid released by the penis between the beginning of arousal and ejaculation.  Some people release a small amount of pre-ejaculate; others may release quite a bit.

Although pre-ejaculate does not contain sperm when it is produced, it can pick up leftover sperm in the urethra. This means that pre-ejaculate can contain sperm when it leaves the body, creating a risk for pregnancy.  Pre-ejaculate can also transmit STIs.

The best way to reduce the risk of pregnancy is to use forms of birth control consistently and correctly. Most forms of birth control can be up to 99% effective when used correctly. Remember, birth control does not reduce the risk of STIs, only condoms and dental dams can.

 Teen Clinic offers all different types of birth control. Call us at 303-442-5160 if you want to make an appointment!

 

 

 

 

I haven’t got my period and I’m 15 ….

….and I’m going to have sex.  Is this okay?

There’s only one person who can tell or decide if you’re ready to have sex or participate in sexual activities: you! If you’re considering becoming sexually active, spend some time thinking about why sexual activity might be right for you. Make sure you’re not feeling pressured by friends or a partner.  Be confident that sex isn’t linked to your self-esteem, and definitely don’t have sex just because someone else wants you to.

Another important thing to think about is consent. Consent is when people agree to a sexual activity without pressure, force or without being tricked. Anyone involved in the activity must be comfortable and feel safe.  Another thing to think about is your “readiness.” It’s important that someone feels emotionally and physically ready for any type of sexual activity. Knowing the risks, knowing a partner and knowing yourself are key parts of readiness.

Even if you haven’t had your first period yet, there can still be a risk for pregnancy.  This is because before someone’s first period, their ovaries release the first ovum, or egg, during ovulation.  They can become pregnant if they have intercourse around the time of their first ovulation

So,  if you’re sexually active, be sure to prevent unplanned pregnancy (if you are having the type of sex that can lead to pregnancy) and STIs by using condoms and choosing a reliable birth control method.

If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic give us a call at 303-442-5160

Can you get pregnant when you have sex and you are still on your period?

Thanks for asking this!

Whether someone chooses to have sex on their period is totally up to them!

However, pregnancy is also still possible when someone has sex on their period because pregnancy depends on ovulation ( when the egg is released from the ovary) and ovulation can happen anytime during the month.

Also, STIs can be transmitted through genital to genital contact, sexual fluids AND blood, there would be a higher risk of STI transmission. Condoms can reduce the risk of STI transmission by 98% when used correctly.

In addition to using a condom, it would be a good idea to be on a form of birth control as well. Most forms of birth control can reduce the risk of pregnancy up to 99% when they are used correctly.

If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic, give us a call at 303-442-5160

My period is always super heavy…

…..and I hate it because you can’t go back and forth to the restroom at school . I have been wanting to get on birth control but I am scared to. My question is, if I just started my period and have a appointment to get the birth control shot will it make my period worse ?

Great question!

It can seem scary or intimidating to see a doctor about birth control if you haven’t before. But know that it is something many people do! LOTS of people start birth control for reasons unrelated to pregnancy.  That is because birth control can help with many things like: regulating a period, making a period lighter, stopping a period all together, acne, ovarian cysts, and the list goes on!

If you are deciding on a method like the Depo Shot it is important to know many people experience a change in period with the shot.

It might take your body some time to get used to the new hormones in the body, so you may have some irregular bleeding at first.  After the first few shots, many people experience lighter periods, or no periods at all! This is perfectly medically okay. This happens because the hormones cause the uterine lining to thin out, which can cause a change in a person’s bleeding.

Make sure you ask your doctor any questions or express any concerns you have about the Depo Shot and your period.

If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic, you can call us at 303-442-5160

Is it ok to have vaginal sex on your period?

Thanks for asking this!

Whether someone chooses to have sex on their period is totally up to them!

What is important to remember though is that it would be important to use a condom to reduce the risk of STI transmission.  Since STIs can be transmitted through genital to genital contact, sexual fluids AND blood, there would be a higher risk of transmission. Condoms can reduce the risk of STI transmission by 98% when used correctly.

Pregnancy is also still possible when someone has sex on their period because pregnancy depends on ovulation ( when the egg is released from the ovary) and ovulation can happen anytime during the month.

In addition to using a condom, it would be a good idea to be on a form of birth control as well. Most forms of birth control can reduce the risk of pregnancy up to 99% when they are used correctly.

 

If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic or have more questions, give us a call at 303-442-5160