Archive for vagina

I’m a female in my teens…

….. I’m wondering what’s going on with my body. I have a strong odor coming from down there (but it doesn’t smell like fish). My underwear is always wet for no reason . I am also getting a clear discharge . What could it be ? Thanks.

Vaginas and penis‘ are self-cleaning organs. Much like earwax and tears are parts of the normal functioning of the ear and eye, people secrete moisture from the membranes that line the vagina. These normal secretions help control the growth of organisms—like yeast and certain bacteria—that are normal, healthy parts of the vagina.

While everyone’s bodies are different, a certain amount of discharge and odor can be completely normal! Knowing what is normal for your body will help you to know when something is abnormal.

If you noticed a change in odor and/or discharge, it can be a sign of infection.

Some infections like Yeast and Bacterial Vaginosis can occur organically from imbalances in the body (stress, diet, and clothing can all contribute to this). These are not STIs, but can be treated. Some of these infections may resolve themselves, but others require medical treatment. Although Yeast and Bacterial Vaginosis are not STIs, some STIs can also cause abnormal discharge.

If you are having discharge and you’re not sure if it’s normal for your body, it may be a good idea to make an appointment at Teen Clinic

If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic give us a call at 303-442-5160 to ask more questions or to make an appointment.

what exactly does a douche and a pad do?…

….. I’ve heard douche as an insult and have seen a design, but I really don’t understand what they do, and for pads, I know they’re for menstruation but I’ve never been really sure what they do.

Thanks for asking this!

A douche  comes in the form of a bottle or a bag, and it sprays water into the vagina.  In the past, people have used a douche to ” clean” the vagina.  Using a douche is no longer recommended however.  This is because vaginas are self cleaning  organs. Discharge is a fluid that leaves the vagina and it is how the body naturally cleans itself.  Using a douche can get rid of the healthy bacteria in the vagina, which can cause vaginal infections.  It can also cause any present infections in the vagina to spread.  Recommended vaginal hygiene really just includes washing the vulva with mild soap and water.

You are right that pads are used during menstruation.  They are made of absorbent materials, and they are placed on the inside of the underwear to absorb menstrual blood. There are different types, brands, and sizes of pads.  They are really just a personal preference that someone can use during their period.

If you have any more questions or want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic. Give us a call at 303-442-5160

What does it mean when the vagina itches and burns for no reason does it mean I have an infection?

Burning in and around the vagina could mean a variety of things.

Some people with a vagina may experience yeast infections or bacterial vaginitis that can cause burning. Burning can also be a symptom of some sexually transmitted infections.In order for someone to contract an STI, they would need to engage in sexual activity with a person who already has an STI.

If this burning continues, it would be a good idea to see a medical professional to figure out exactly what is going on. You can learn how to make an appointment here.  You can also take comfort in knowing that all of our clinicians here at Teen Clinic specialize in seeing teens and provide non-judgmental care! Give us a call with more questions! 303-442-5160.

Why does my vagina burn during and after sex? Is it my birth control pill?

If your vagina is feeling uncomfortable during and after sex, it may be due to several things.

If your partner is using their hands or fingers to sexually stimulate (or finger) you, it’s very important to emphasize hygiene. It’s important to make sure you or your partner are washing your hands with an unscented soap before sexual stimulation begins. If your partner did not wash their hands before touching your vagina, they may have had something on their hands that could irritate your vagina.

There’s also the possibility that the sex was too rough. It’s important to talk about your level of comfort before engaging in sexual intercourse. That way, you can tell your partner if they are working at a level that is both comfortable and pleasurable for you.

If the discomfort that you felt lasted for a few hours or up to a day after sex, it could have been some sort of vaginal irritation. But it is impossible to say for sure what could be going on over the internet.

If the discomfort lasted for longer than a few hours or a day, it could be a sign of infection and you would want to make an appointment with a medical professional. A medical professional would be able to tell you what might be going on with your body.

It is very unlikely that any vaginal discomfort (like a burning sensation) would be due to your birth control pill.

You can learn how to make an appointment here.  You can also take comfort in knowing that all of our clinicians here at Teen Clinic specialize in seeing teens and provide non-judgmental care! Give us a call with more questions! 303-442-5160.

Can you get pregnant if the penis just rubs against the vagina a couple times and didn’t go in?

In order for someone to get pregnant, semen needs to come into direct contact with the vagina. But even if someone does not ejaculate in the vagina, there is still a risk of pregnancy. If someone ejaculates on the outside of the body but still near the vagina, sperm can travel in to the vagina, putting them at risk of pregnancy.

If someone is having unprotected sex, but they don’t ejaculate in or near their  partner, pregnancy can still be possible as well because of something called pre-cum (or pre-ejaculate). Pre-cum is something that everyone with a penis does when arousal happens. Pre-cum—officially called pre-ejaculate—is a clear, sticky fluid released by the penis between the beginning of arousal and ejaculation.  Doctors believe that pre-ejaculate helps make the urethra and the vagina less acidic, allowing sperm to survive longer.  Some people release a small amount of pre-ejaculate; others may release quite a bit.

Although pre-ejaculate does not contain sperm when it is produced, it can pick up leftover sperm in the urethra. This means that pre-ejaculate can contain sperm when it leaves the body, creating a risk for pregnancy.  Pre-ejaculate can also transmit STIs.

Did you know that sperm can also survive inside the vagina for 2-3 days under normal conditions?  If that person ovulates several days after bleeding has stopped, they may become pregnant from sperm left in the vaginal canal during intercourse.

The best way to avoid pregnancy is to use forms of birth control consistently and correctly. Teen Clinic offers all different types of birth control. Call us at 303-442-5160 if you have more questions or want to make an appointment!

I tend to bleed after having sex. Is that normal or is there something going on that I should get checked out?

This is a hard question to answer without having a medical professional assess the symptoms in person, but we can try and help clear some things up for you.

Vaginal bleeding can be a sign of infection, whether a sexually transmitted infection or an organic infection, like yeast or bacterial vaginitis, or it can be something entirely different.

To start off, it’s important to note that someone’s period can actually fluctuate based on what’s going on in their life.  This means that stresssicknesschange in physical activity, or even worrying about being pregnant can make a period act differently- potentially causing abnormal bleeding.

While someone’s menstruation can happen on the traditional 28-day cycle, plenty do not.  It’s possible that you may have had an annovulatory cycle (that you did not release an egg this month).  A missed ovulation can translate to a missed or irregular period. While this can be healthy and normal, make an appointment if you find yourself worrying about your period. Our Teen Clinic practitioners can offer tips and strategies for regulating the period, and they’ll make sure you’re healthy.

It’s also possible that you were spotting a small amount before having sex and didn’t notice, but noticed afterwards because of the increase in sexual fluids.

Another possibility is that the sexual contact is too rough, or that enough lubrication was not used before hand. It’s important to talk about your level of comfort before engaging in sexual contact. That way, you can tell your partner if they are working at a level that is both comfortable and pleasurable for you.

Lubrication is important during sexual contact as well. Although vaginas and penis’ are self-lubricating organs, often times enough lubrication is not produced. Some bodies self-lubricate quite a bit; some don’t at all!  Lubrication will lower the  amount of friction during intercourse, reducing the chances that a barrier method (like a external or internal condom) will tear or that a mucus membrane (like the vagina, penis, or anus) will become irritated.

Even if your body does self-lubricate, it’s great to have a bottle of water-based lube on hand just in case things become dry and uncomfortable.

It’s also good to know that any time someone comes into contact with one or more of the four modes of transmission, they can be at risk of STI (or sexually transmitted infection) transmission.  The four modes of transmission are…

  • Blood
  • Skin to skin contact
  • Sexual fluids (semen and vaginal fluids)
  • Mother to child (breastmilk and vaginal delivery)

In order for someone to contract an STI, they would need to engage in sexual activity with a person who already has an STI in which one or more of these modes would come into play. Although STIs can be common, remember that they are preventable!

STIs can be transmitted through oral sex, anal sex, and vaginal sex. Many people think that with oral sex, there is little to no risk. But the fact is, you can get all STIs (except for pubic lice) when engaging in oral sex with someone who has the infection.

So remember to reduce your risk of STI transmission by using barrier methods and getting tested regularly!

The best thing for you to do is to make an appointment with a medical professional. They will be able to assess your symptoms and help you know for sure what is going on with your body. Teen Clinic offers confidential and low-cost services. Call us to make an appointment! 303-442-5160.

I just recently had oral sex with my boyfriend and now the right side of my vagina itches…

…The other day I experienced white discharge. Now that this has happened I’m afraid I might have something. I’m so worried and this happened only 3 days ago (the oral sex). Can issues show up that quickly?

Although these can be symptoms of an STI (or sexually transmitted infection), these can also be symptoms of something totally different, like a skin irritation. Before we jump to a conclusion about either one, let’s talk about oral sex and it’s relationship to STIs.

Many people believe that because oral sex isn’t vaginal or anal penetration, there is little to no risk. But the fact is, you can get all STIs, (except for pubic lice) when engaging in oral sex with someone who has the infection. There are four ways in which someone can contract an STI. They are…

  • Blood
  • Skin to skin contact
  • Sexual fluids (vaginal fluids and semen)
  • Mother to child

When someone is engaging in oral sex, they can come into contact with someone’s blood, sexual fluids, and/or skin. But the good news is that there are ways to prevent STI transmission from happening! Using a condom for oral sex on a penis will help drastically reduce your risk of transmitting an STI.  If oral sex is being performed on the vagina or anus, a dental dam can be used to help reduce your risk also! You can pick up free condoms and dental dams at Teen Clinic!

It may be a great idea that you get tested. Most STIs are asymptomatic, meaning that there are no symptoms but that the STI is still causing harm to the body. Because of this, getting tested on a regular basis is a great way to ensure that you’re healthy.

If someone does have symptoms, it’s hard to say when or how they would show up– this depends on that specific person. Depending on what type of STI test someone is getting, the test would usually show accurate results 2 weeks after a potential exposure.

Teen Clinic provides free or low-cost and confidential STI testing, most of which are very simple and painless tests! Remember that flavored condoms and dental dams are effective methods for reducing the transmission of STIs during oral sex! Until you are tested and potentially treated, abstain for sexual activity or use condoms and dental dams.

Give us a call to get more information and/or to make an appointment! 303-442-5160.

My boyfriend fingered me a few times and ever since then my vagina has been feeling uncomfortable…

…He did it again and then we had sex. Now my vagina burns and when I use the toilet it’s very uncomfortable, even if I’m doing nothing apart from sitting down, inside my vagina hurts. What could be the problem and how should I solve it?

When someone is using their hands or fingers to sexually stimulate (or finger) someone, it’s very important to emphasize hygiene. It’s important to make sure you or your partner are washing your hands with an unscented soap before sexual stimulation begins. If your partner did not wash their hands before fingering you, they may have had something on their hands that could irritate your vagina.

There’s also the possibility that your partner was too rough while fingering you. It’s important to talk about your level of comfort before engaging in manual stimulation. That way, you can tell your partner if they are working at a level that is both comfortable and pleasurable for you.

If the discomfort that you felt lasted for a few hours or up to a day after your partner fingered you, it could have been some sort of vaginal irritation. But it is impossible to say for sure what could be going on over the internet.

If the discomfort lasted for longer than a few hours or a day, it could be a sign of infection and you would want to make an appointment with a medical professional. A medical professional would be able to tell you what might be going on with your body.

You can learn how to make an appointment here.  You can also take comfort in knowing that all of our clinicians here at Teen Clinic specialize in seeing teens and provide non-judgmental care! Give us a call with more questions! 303-442-5160.

Does the vagina have a smell? And what exactly does a yeast infection in the vagina look like?

All people with a vagina have a vaginal scent that is normal for them. However, the scent will vary from person to person. Some people may have a stronger odor to their vagina, while others have a faint odor. The scent may also change throughout someone’s menstrual cycle; becoming milder and stronger at different points of the cycle. Having some sort of vaginal scent can be completely normal.

It’s important to note however that if someone notices that their normal scent changes suddenly, it can be a sign of infection. If someone notices that the scent becomes much stronger, seems foul, or is accompanied by a change in discharge, an infection may be present and a trip to the doctor would be recommended.

This is a great example of why it’s so important for someone to really pay attention to their body. When you know what’s normal for your body, it’ll be easier for you to know when something is abnormal.

Yeast infections can occur (and can be common) for someone who has a vagina.Yeast infections are not considered an STI (Sexually Transmitted Infection). But what is a yeast infection? Yeast is a natural part of the vaginal flora, existing in balance with different types of bacteria. Sometimes yeast can overgrow—this is what we call a yeast infection. Yeast overgrowth can occur for many reasons, including illness, recent antibiotic use, poor vaginal hygiene, and eating too much sugar. Symptoms of a yeast infection can include itching, burning, bleeding after intercourse, and an increase in white, clumpy discharge.

If you have any other questions about the vagina or think you or someone you know has an infection, give us a call or make an appointment! 303-442-5160.

I am 15 years old and have never had sex. However, the skin around my vaginal area is darker than any other skin…

…and the labia minora is also a discolored purplish brown.  Is this normal or even safe?

This is a great question!

The human body comes in an amazing variety of shapes, sizes, and even coloring!  How genitalia looks can vary quite a bit. It’s healthy to remember that everyone is different; there really is no such thing as normal. Anatomically, darker skin around the labia is very common.  However, if the discoloration is a new occurrence or you’re in pain, you may want to make an appointment with a medical provider to know for sure!

Keep in mind that not only do people come in different shapes,  sizes, and colors,  people like different shapes, sizes, and colors!  No matter how unique your body parts may seem, chances are there’s someone who prefers the way you look.

If you find yourself worrying often about how your body looks, consider contacting the Boulder Youth Body Alliance (BYBA). BYBA is a group of high-school-aged peer educators who are trained to help you better understand and love your body. (Visit their website here, or friend them on Facebook.)

You can also come into Teen Clinic by making an appointment here. All of our Teen Clinic staff specialize in teen care and treat teens without judgement!

Don’t forget that your body is fabulous, unique, and just right for you!