Archive for your health

Does it hurt when you have sex for the time?

This is a great question!

Keep in mind that not everyone defines “sex” the same way. To some people, “sex” refers only to vaginal intercourse. To others, it includes oral and anal intercourse.  To others still, “sex” includes mutual masturbation and/or sex toy play.

If you are referring to vaginal intercourse, many people think vaginal intercourse has to hurt the first time it happens, but this is not the case!

Here are some things to consider to make intercourse more pleasurable and safe, whether it is someone’s first time or not:

  • Make sure partners are fully aroused before beginning intercourse. Engaging in foreplay—kissing, oral sex, or mutual masturbation, for instance—stimulates blood flow to the genitals, which allows the tissue in the vaginal canal to stretch.  Also, most vaginas self-lubricate when aroused, which can make things more comfortable.
  • Some people have a thin membrane, called a hymen, blocking the entrance to their vaginas. Hymens can be stretched by fingers, tampons, penises, or other things inserted into the vagina. Not all people are born with a hymen, however, and some are broken in childhood by everyday activities like sports.  If you are engaging in vaginal intercourse for the first time, it is possible to feel a brief pain as the hymen breaks.  A small amount of blood may be present.  Know that this is normal and involves no lasting damage! This also may not happen to people at all.
  • Use lubrication. Some bodies self-lubricate quite a bit; some don’t at all!  Lubrication will lower the  amount of friction during intercourse, allowing the penis to slide in and out without catching on the vaginal tissue.  Even if your body does self-lubricate, it’s great to have a bottle of water-based lube on hand just in case things become dry and uncomfortable. It is important to use water based lubrication with condom use. This is because any type of lubrication that has oil in it ( like lotion, Vaseline, etc) can break down the material of the condom, making it less effective.

Another important thing to think about is consent. Consent is when people agree to a sexual activity without pressure, force or without being tricked. Anyone involved in the activity must be comfortable and feel safe.  Another thing to think about is your “readiness.” It’s important that someone feels emotionally and physically ready for any type of sexual activity. Knowing the risks, knowing a partner and knowing yourself are key parts of readiness.

Know that you have the right to change your mind at any moment. Even if you’ve consented to an activity once, it doesn’t automatically mean you consent every time after that! And if you’re sexually active, be sure to prevent unplanned pregnancy by choosing a reliable birth control method (if you are engaging in the type of sex where pregnancy may occur). Also, remember to protect yourself from STI transmission by using condoms and/or dental dams. It would also be a good idea for anyone involved to get tested for STIs before sexual contact occurs.

At the end of the day, it’s your body—and you have the right to make decisions that work for you. Teen Clinic encourages everyone to talk with a trusted adult – whether that’s a parent, another relative, a teacher, coach or clinician – if they are thinking about becoming sexually active.

If you need to make an appointment with us to get tested, start birth control, get more information, or anything else, give us a call at 303-442-5160!

I’m 13 and I haven’t had my period in 3-4 months…..

…..I’m not sexually active and the first time I had my period was when I was 10-11. So shouldn’t my flow be normal already? This type of problem had happened before when I was 12 or 13. I hadn’t had my period for 2-3 months but I came back then disappeared again… should I be worried?

Thanks for asking this!

It is important to know there are many reasons why someone may not have a regular period.  When someone gets their period for the first time, it is possible for it to take some time before someone has a predictable and routine cycle.

Sometimes a person just naturally has a less predictable period, which can be perfectly medically okay.  Also, lots of factors can make a person’s period fluctuate. Things like being sick, sleep, stress, exercise, and diet can all make a person’s period change or fluctuate.

If you are concerned about your period, or you would like to discuss ways to regulate your period (there are many types of birth control methods that help people regulate/manage their periods) you can call us at Teen Clinic to make an appointment! 303-442-5160

Is it bad to douche?

Thanks for asking this!

A douche  comes in the form of a bottle or a bag, and it sprays water into the vagina.  In the past, people have used a douche to ” clean” the vagina.  Using a douche is no longer recommended.  This is because vaginas are self cleaning  organs. Discharge is a fluid that leaves the vagina and it is how the body naturally cleans itself.

Using a douche can get rid of the healthy bacteria in the vagina, which can cause vaginal infections.  It can also cause any present infections in the vagina to spread.  Recommended vaginal hygiene really just includes washing the vulva with mild soap and water.

If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic. Give us a call at 303-442-5160

Hey I’m 15 turning 16 soon and I’ve been thinking about shaving down there but I’m not sure on how to?

Everyone has pubic hair. Usually you’ll start to notice pubic hair around puberty. Pubic hair is a completely normal part of growing up.

Choosing whether or not to shave your genitals is a very personal decision.  Some people shave because they find it more attractive; some people don’t shave because they find having hair more attractive. Some people shave because they find it more pleasurable; some people don’t shave because they find it more pleasurable!  In the end, your decision will come down to what you prefer–it’s your body!

Medically, either decision can be safe, and there isn’t really a right or wrong way for someone to shave their genitals.  Keep in mind that small cuts in the genital area make it easier for sexually transmitted infections to spread. If you do shave and happen to cut yourself, and you are sexually active, make sure you know whether or not your partner has STIs  and avoid intercourse until the cuts have healed. It is also a good idea to use condoms and/or dental dams during sexual contact to reduce the risk of STIs. Those who shave may experience itching when the hair begins to grow back in. They may also experience ingrown hairs, which is when a hair grows backward into the skin, causing inflammation and irritation.  However, plenty of healthy and happy people remove the hair from their genitals.

If you want to make an appointment with us at Teen Clinic feel free to give us a call at 303-442-5160

Is it good to lose your virginity at a teen age?

Whats important to know is that “virginity” isn’t a medical term, and people can make that definition for themselves. But, there’s only one person who can tell if you’re ready to have sex or participate in sexual activities: you! If you’re considering becoming sexually active, spend some time thinking about why sexual activity might be right for you. Make sure you’re not feeling pressured by friends or a partner.  Be confident that sex isn’t linked to your self-esteem, and definitely don’t have sex just because someone else wants you to.

Another important thing to think about is consent. Consent is when people agree to a sexual activity without pressure, force or without being tricked. Anyone involved in the activity must be comfortable and feel safe.  Another thing to think about is your “readiness.” It’s important that someone feels emotionally and physically ready for any type of sexual activity. Knowing the risks, knowing a partner and knowing yourself are key parts of readiness.

And if you’re sexually active, be sure to prevent unplanned pregnancy (if you are having the type of sex that can lead to pregnancy) and STIs by using condoms and choosing a reliable birth control method.  Before you decide, it would be a good idea to get tested! Teen Clinic provides low-cost and confidential STI testing and birth control consultations.

At the end of the day, it’s your body—and you have the right to make decisions that work for you. Teen Clinic encourages everyone to talk with a trusted adult – whether that’s a parent, another relative, a teacher, coach or clinician – if they are thinking about becoming sexually active.

 

If you have more questions or want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic, give us a call! 303-442-5160

Does being fingered hurt?…

…I’ve been with this guy for 2 months now and we’re both ready

Everyone’s body & experience of pain is different. But it is important to know that sexual contact does not have to hurt.

Start slow & use lubrication if needed.  The body self lubricates naturally but using extra lubrication sometimes is needed! Lubrication helps reduce the risk of friction which can make things more comfortable.

Communication is also important.  If something ever doesn’t feel good or hurts during sexual contact this should be communicated and sexual contact should stop.

If you have more questions or want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic give us a call at 303-442-5160

I’m a female in my teens…

….. I’m wondering what’s going on with my body. I have a strong odor coming from down there (but it doesn’t smell like fish). My underwear is always wet for no reason . I am also getting a clear discharge . What could it be ? Thanks.

Vaginas and penis‘ are self-cleaning organs. Much like earwax and tears are parts of the normal functioning of the ear and eye, people secrete moisture from the membranes that line the vagina. These normal secretions help control the growth of organisms—like yeast and certain bacteria—that are normal, healthy parts of the vagina.

While everyone’s bodies are different, a certain amount of discharge and odor can be completely normal! Knowing what is normal for your body will help you to know when something is abnormal.

If you noticed a change in odor and/or discharge, it can be a sign of infection.

Some infections like Yeast and Bacterial Vaginosis can occur organically from imbalances in the body (stress, diet, and clothing can all contribute to this). These are not STIs, but can be treated. Some of these infections may resolve themselves, but others require medical treatment. Although Yeast and Bacterial Vaginosis are not STIs, some STIs can also cause abnormal discharge.

If you are having discharge and you’re not sure if it’s normal for your body, it may be a good idea to make an appointment at Teen Clinic

If you want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic give us a call at 303-442-5160 to ask more questions or to make an appointment.

Are we meant to shave before sex?………

…………I really wanna know because I’m not sure if a boy would like us as girls to have pubic hair.

Choosing whether or not to shave your genitals is a very personal decision, that should only be made by you.  Some people shave because they find it more attractive; some people don’t shave because they find having hair more attractive. Some people like shaving, some people don’t! In the end, your decision will come down to what you prefer.  Try to avoid thinking of shaving as something you’re “supposed to” do or what other people would like–it’s your body!

Medically, either decision can be safe and clean.  Keep in mind that small cuts in the genital area make it easier for sexually transmitted infections to spread. If you do shave and happen to cut yourself, make sure you know whether or not your partner has STIs, and avoid intercourse until the cuts have healed.  Those who shave may experience itching when the hair begins to grow back in. They may also experience ingrown hairs, which is when a hair grows backward into the skin, causing inflammation and irritation.  However, plenty of healthy and happy adults remove the hair from their genitals.  It’s really all up to you!

If you have more questions or want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic give us a call at 303-442-5160

what exactly does a douche and a pad do?…

….. I’ve heard douche as an insult and have seen a design, but I really don’t understand what they do, and for pads, I know they’re for menstruation but I’ve never been really sure what they do.

Thanks for asking this!

A douche  comes in the form of a bottle or a bag, and it sprays water into the vagina.  In the past, people have used a douche to ” clean” the vagina.  Using a douche is no longer recommended however.  This is because vaginas are self cleaning  organs. Discharge is a fluid that leaves the vagina and it is how the body naturally cleans itself.  Using a douche can get rid of the healthy bacteria in the vagina, which can cause vaginal infections.  It can also cause any present infections in the vagina to spread.  Recommended vaginal hygiene really just includes washing the vulva with mild soap and water.

You are right that pads are used during menstruation.  They are made of absorbent materials, and they are placed on the inside of the underwear to absorb menstrual blood. There are different types, brands, and sizes of pads.  They are really just a personal preference that someone can use during their period.

If you have any more questions or want to make an appointment at Teen Clinic. Give us a call at 303-442-5160

Hi I have these white bumps around the edge of the head of my penis……..

…………..I’d heard they’re nothing to worry about but I’m becoming extremely self conscious of them. I feel really embarrassed and awkward to talk to anyone about them. Thanks.

Bumps on the penis can mean many different things. This could be something as simple as an ingrown hair, or something more serious like an STI.

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to tell what’s going on without seeing a doctor in person. You can call us at the Teen Clinic to make an appointment with one of our doctors. Just call us at 303-442-5160